SERUM LEAD LEVELS AND ITS HEMATOLOGICAL EFFECTS IN MALE CAR PAINTERS OF LAHORE

Ayesha Pervez, Fozan Ahmad, Fahmida Khatoon, Zamir Ahmed, Sadia Mahmood

Abstract


Background: Lead is a poisonous metal and is widely used in daily life. Increased use of lead in industry, and its excessive inhalation and ingestion can adversely affect the major biological functions in human body. This study was conducted to determine the serum lead levels and its toxic effects on hematological indices.
Material & Methods: This descriptive study was carried out in 70 male car painters working in Lahore. Blood lead concentrations was determined by atomic absorption spectrometer. Serum lead levels were observed and hematological changes were also checked. Data analysis was done by SPSS version 20.
Results: The 70 car painters were divided on basis of exposure into two groups; one with <10 and other with >10 years. The age range from 25 to 45 years with a mean of 30.41±4.99. The serum lead levels ranged from 10.40μg/dL to 24.40μg/dL with mean 15.34±3.44. The difference in means of the two groups was statistically insignificant (p=0.25). RBC count ranged from 4.07x106/μL to 5.85x106/μL with mean 5.00±0.36. The difference in means of two groups was statistically insignificant (p=0.13). Hb of car painters ranged from 9.0 g/dL to 17.40 g/dL with mean 14.34±1.13. The difference in means of the two groups was statistically insignificant (p value 0.18). HCT ranged from 36.1% to 48.40% with a mean of 41.74±2.38. The difference in means of the two groups was statistically significant (p=0.003). MCV ranged from 78.4fL to 97.40fL with a mean of 84.72±4.10 (p=0.51). MCH ranged from 18.0 to 33.70 with a mean of 28.90±2.18. The difference of means in two groups was statis¬tically insignificant (p value 0.86). MCHC of the subjects ranged from 19.7 to 36.7 with a mean of 33.56±2.09. The difference in means of MCHC in two groups was statistically insignificant (p=0.32). The mean values of Red Blood Cell count among the two groups was 4.951 and 5.082 respectively but were statistically insignificant with a p value of 0.139.
Conclusion: Serum lead levels were below the safety limits in all the subjects. The duration of exposure had no effects on call the hematological indices except hematocrit.

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Copyright (c) 2020 Ayesha Pervez, Fozan Ahmad, Fahmida Khatoon, Zamir Ahmed, Sadia Mahmood

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